Byblos


Byblos (Jbail) in Lebanon is believed to date back as far as 6230 BC one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities, as attested by the incredibly diverse ages of its ruins. Thought to have first inhabited sometime around the fifth millennium BC, Byblos began as a Neolithic village of fisherman. 

Over time, Byblos would, amongst other things, become a Phoenician trading hub called Gublu, be taken by Alexander the Great in 333BC, be ruled by the Greeks (this as when it acquired its current name) and then fall to Pompey, becoming a Roman city in the 1st century BC. Byblos began to decline under the Byzantines, who took it in 399AD. 

Today, Byblos bears the marks of all of these civilizations. Stone Age, Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age dwelling sit side by side with a royal Phoenician necropolis and Roman sites such as a theatre, a road, and nymphaeum. There is also a 12th century Crusader Castle, a reminder of when Byblos was conquered in 1104. 

In addition to its fascinating ruins, Byblos is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site for its contribution to modern language. In particular, Byblos is connected with the Phoenicians' development of the predecessor of our alphabet. There’s plenty to see at Byblos, some in its main archaeological site, other elements dotted around its medieval town centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alternative Titles: Gebal, Gibelet, Gubla, Jebeil, Jubayl, Kubna

Byblos, modern Jbail, also spelled Jubayl, or Jebeil, biblical Gebal, ancient seaport, the site of which is located on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, about 20 miles (30 km) north of the modern city of BeirutLebanon. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited towns in the world.

 

The name Byblos is Greek; papyrus received its early Greek name (Byblos, Byblinos) from its being exported to the Aegean through Byblos. Hence the English word Bible is derived from Byblos as “the (papyrus) book.”

Modern archaeological excavations have revealed that Byblos was occupied at least by the Neolithic Period (New Stone Age; c. 8000–c. 4000 BC) and that during the 4th millennium BC an extensive settlement developed there. Because Byblos was the chief harbor for the export of cedar and other valuable wood to Egypt, it soon became a great trading centre; it was called Kubna in ancient Egyptian and Gubla in Akkadian, the language of Assyria. Egyptian monuments and inscriptions found on the site attest to close relations with the Nile River valley throughout the second half of the 2nd millennium. During Egypt’s 12th dynasty (1938–1756 BC), Byblos again became an Egyptian dependency, and the chief goddess of the city, Baalat (“The Mistress”), with her well-known temple at Byblos, was worshiped in Egypt. After the collapse of the Egyptian New Kingdom in the 11th century BC, Byblos became the foremost city of Phoenicia.

The Phoenician alphabet was developed at Byblos, and the site has yielded almost all of the known early Phoenician inscriptions, most of them dating from the 10th century BC. By that time, however, the Sidonian kingdom, with its capital at Tyre, had become dominant in Phoenicia, and Byblos, though it flourished into Roman times, never recovered its former supremacy. The Crusaders captured the town in 1103 and called it Gibelet. They built a castle there (using stone from earlier structures) but were driven out by the Ayyūbid sultan Saladin in 1189. The town subsequently sank into obscurity.

The ancient ruins of Byblos were rediscovered by the French historian Ernest Renan, who led a survey of the area. Systematic excavations were begun there by Pierre Montet in 1921; in the mid-1920s Maurice Dunand resumed the work and continued it until the mid-1970s. The ruins today consist of the Crusader fortifications and gate; a Roman colonnade and small theatre; Phoenician ramparts, three major temples, and a necropolis; and remains of Neolithic dwellings.

 

Byblos was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984.

Present-day Jbail is adjacent to the archaeological site, extending from there to the waterfront area. Tourism is a major component of the local economy. In addition to the ruins, other notable attractions are the Church of St. John the Baptist, portions of which date to the early Crusader period and a wax museum (opened 1970) dedicated to the area’s history and rural Lebanese life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12th century Crusader Castle, a reminder of when Byblos was conquered in 1104 

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